More on Web 2.0 Survey

Business Week has posted a review of the McKinsey web 2.0 executive survey report that I posted on recently.

Business Week note that:

Executives report three main uses for Web 2.0 technologies: Seventy percent of companies rely on them to talk with customers. Fifty-one percent use them to talk with suppliers and business partners. And 75% use them to manage internal collaboration. Many of these folks say they rely on Web 2.0 for tools to design and develop products. An example: setting up systems to gather and share ideas.

In addition,

technology adoption is becoming decentralized. A decade ago, the IT department drove investments in most new technologies. Now, these tools are just as likely to bubble up from other departments. “Corporate strategy can define technology strategy”

Interestingly, Business Week interpret the McKinsey survey report as telling as the glass is half empty, rather than half full: the McKinsey survey of global executives tells us that

  • blogs are currently used as a key web 2.0 technology by 32% of companies surveyed (33% for wikis),
  • blogs are one of the “3 technologies or tools that are most important for your business” for 17% of companies surveyed with another 16% investing in blog technology (10% and 13% for wikis)

However, Business Week emphasise the relative importance of technologies such as web services (80%), peer-to-peer networking (47%) and social networking (37%) over blogs (32%) and Wikis (33%):

Companies may talk about embracing Web 2.0, but they’re slow to invest in blogs, wikis, and many of the other new collaborative technologies that are generating headlines. Instead, they’re putting their resources behind technologies that enable automation and networking

In interpreting this claim, it should be noted that Web Services and Service Oriented Architectures are a natural extension of IT n-tier architecture principles and a fundamental component of modern IT ‘best practice’ that companies will naturally adopt, and it is difficult to see why this mainstream technology architectural choice should be regarded as a Web 2.0 technology of the same kind as the others considered in the survey. Peer-to-peer networking is in a similar category. Conversely, the survey report did not address the extent to which companies may have already used Content Management Systems to perform many of the functions of Wikis – with greater organisational control over content, processes and security – and therefore not displayed interest in or use of Wikis because they already had an equivalent solution. Similarly, web content pages with news articles that individuals/staff could maintain, support discussion forums and similar technologies may have substituted for blogs. Without this additional reference information, it is difficult to accept Business Week’s proposition regarding the relative importance of the survey outcomes, and this ‘relative importance’ argument must be taken with ‘a grain of salt.’

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More on Web 2.0 Survey

Business Week has posted a review of the McKinsey web 2.0 executive survey report that I posted on recently.

Business Week note that:

Executives report three main uses for Web 2.0 technologies: Seventy percent of companies rely on them to talk with customers. Fifty-one percent use them to talk with suppliers and business partners. And 75% use them to manage internal collaboration. Many of these folks say they rely on Web 2.0 for tools to design and develop products. An example: setting up systems to gather and share ideas.

In addition,

technology adoption is becoming decentralized. A decade ago, the IT department drove investments in most new technologies. Now, these tools are just as likely to bubble up from other departments. “Corporate strategy can define technology strategy”

Interestingly, Business Week interpret the McKinsey survey report as telling as the glass is half empty, rather than half full: the McKinsey survey of global executives tells us that

  • blogs are currently used as a key web 2.0 technology by 32% of companies surveyed (33% for wikis),
  • blogs are one of the “3 technologies or tools that are most important for your business” for 17% of companies surveyed with another 16% investing in blog technology (10% and 13% for wikis)

However, Business Week emphasise the relative importance of technologies such as web services (80%), peer-to-peer networking (47%) and social networking (37%) over blogs (32%) and Wikis (33%):

Companies may talk about embracing Web 2.0, but they’re slow to invest in blogs, wikis, and many of the other new collaborative technologies that are generating headlines. Instead, they’re putting their resources behind technologies that enable automation and networking

In interpreting this claim, it should be noted that Web Services and Service Oriented Architectures are a natural extension of IT n-tier architecture principles and a fundamental component of modern IT ‘best practice’ that companies will naturally adopt, and it is difficult to see why this mainstream technology architectural choice should be regarded as a Web 2.0 technology of the same kind as the others considered in the survey. Peer-to-peer networking is in a similar category. Conversely, the survey report did not address the extent to which companies may have already used Content Management Systems to perform many of the functions of Wikis – with greater organisational control over content, processes and security – and therefore not displayed interest in or use of Wikis because they already had an equivalent solution. Similarly, web content pages with news articles that individuals/staff could maintain, support discussion forums and similar technologies may have substituted for blogs. Without this additional reference information, it is difficult to accept Business Week’s proposition regarding the relative importance of the survey outcomes, and this ‘relative importance’ argument must be taken with ‘a grain of salt.’

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.