Thinking Differently with the DeBono Institute

I recently attended an innovation conference co-sponsored by the VPS-CIN and the Hargraves Institute.

One of the presenters was DeBono Instute CEO Susie Mackie, who was speaking on how one aspect of the DeBono thinking tools can be used to enhance our creativity.

Susie suggested that when we set out to generate ideas to solve problems, our mental functioning tends to gravitate around certain tracks of thinking.

For example, Susie asked us to suggest alternative words for the word “dog.” Some people in the workshop suggested alternatives like “cat” or “fish”, others suggested alternatives like “friend” or “companion” and others “security system.” In this example, the underlying notion of “dog as pet” generated ideas of other pets as alternatives, whereas the idea of “dog as companion” generated various alternatives oriented around companionship.

Susie called these underlying pivots for idea generation “fixed points”, and suggested that our minds easily get into tracks of thinking around these fixed points. Our creativity can be enhanced by becoming aware of these and consiously changing them so we don’t stay in one track of thinking.

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Thinking Differently with the DeBono Institute

I recently attended an innovation conference co-sponsored by the VPS-CIN and the Hargraves Institute.

One of the presenters was DeBono Instute CEO Susie Mackie, who was speaking on how one aspect of the DeBono thinking tools can be used to enhance our creativity.

Susie suggested that when we set out to generate ideas to solve problems, our mental functioning tends to gravitate around certain tracks of thinking.

For example, Susie asked us to suggest alternative words for the word “dog.” Some people in the workshop suggested alternatives like “cat” or “fish”, others suggested alternatives like “friend” or “companion” and others “security system.” In this example, the underlying notion of “dog as pet” generated ideas of other pets as alternatives, whereas the idea of “dog as companion” generated various alternatives oriented around companionship.

Susie called these underlying pivots for idea generation “fixed points”, and suggested that our minds easily get into tracks of thinking around these fixed points. Our creativity can be enhanced by becoming aware of these and consiously changing them so we don’t stay in one track of thinking.

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.